Standard 1.1 The sun appears to move across the sky in the same way every day, but its path changes gradually over the seasons.
  • 1.1.a.2 The sun's position in the daytime sky can be described relative to stationary objects on Earth. For example, the sun can be "just above the treetops,"
"high in the sky," or "or on the other side of the school."
  • 1.1.b.4 Changes in the sun's position throughout the day can be measured by observing changes in shadows outdoors.
  • 1.1.b.5 Shadows occur when light is blocked by an object. An object's shadow appears opposite the light source. Shadow lengths
depend on the position of the light source.

The activities on this page can help students understand the "apparent" movement of the sun across the sky throughout the day. As the length and
shape of the shadow changes, the position of the sun seems to change.
The activities on this page can help students understand the "apparent" movement of the sun across the sky throughout the day. As the length and

shape of the shadow changes, the position of the sun seems to change. Parents and teachers need to address misconceptions about the movement of the sun.



Sunclock.jpg
How to Make a Sun Clock from the Exploratorium


sunshadow2.jpg
Sun and Shadows Lesson Plan from the Utah Education Network

Guessthe shape.gifThis lesson plan for grades K-2 will assess students' understanding of how shadows are made.